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Effect of intravenous glutamine supplementation in trauma patients receiving enteral nutrition (GLINT STUDY): A prospective, blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial
Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences

Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences
Open Access

ISSN: 2155-9600

Effect of intravenous glutamine supplementation in trauma patients receiving enteral nutrition (GLINT STUDY): A prospective, blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial


5th European Nutrition and Dietetics Conference

June 16-18, 2016 Rome, Italy

Ruqaiya Moosa Al Balushi, Jennifer D Paratz, Jeremy Cohen, Merrilyn Banks, Jason A Roberts and Jeffrey Lipman

United Arab Emirates University, UAE
The University of Queensland, Australia
Royal Brisbane & Women√ʬ?¬?s Hospital, Australia

Posters & Accepted Abstracts: J Nutr Food Sci

Abstract :

Introduction: Despite the numerous clinical trials that have investigated the beneficial effects of glutamine supplementation in patients receiving enteral nutrition1, the results are conflicting and inconclusive. This study aimed to determine the effect of intravenous alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) supplementation on improving organ dysfunction and reducing infectious complications in multiple trauma patients receiving enteral nutrition. Methods: A triple-blinded, randomized clinical trial was conducted in multiple trauma patients. Participants were randomized to receive either intravenous Ala-Gln (0.5 g/kg body weight; n=15) or intravenous placebo (n=15). Results: The primary outcome, which was the pattern of change in total Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score over 10 days was not significantly different between groups (intention-to-treat: Regression coefficient 0.4938, 95% CI=-0.8113-1.7988, p=0.46). Although there was no significant difference reported in infectious complications with Ala-Gln supplementation, there was a slight reduction in ventilator-associated pneumonia cases (2 vs. 6; p=0.21). Similarly, there were no significant differences in other secondary outcome measures (e.g. ICU and hospital length of stay). However, there was a significant increase in urea (p=0.001) and creatinine (p=0.01) levels in the Ala-Gln group. There was no significant difference in fat-free mass percentage (p=0.12) or fat mass percentage (p=0.12) between groups. Although there was a significant overall decrease in fat-free mass percentage over time in both groups (p=0.002), the rate of decline in the Ala-Gln group was slower, suggesting a beneficial effect. Conclusion: The benefits of intravenous Ala-Gln were not confirmed in this trial. A rigorous, multicentre trial is needed to confirm the efficacy of intravenous Ala-Gln in preserving lean-body mass in multiple trauma patients. Furthermore, the significant increase in urea and creatinine levels suggests further investigation about the safety of glutamine on renal function.

Biography :

Email: [email protected]

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