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A feasibility and acceptability study of elevated protein dietary intake for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while on psychotropic medication
Autism-Open Access

Autism-Open Access
Open Access

ISSN: 2165-7890

A feasibility and acceptability study of elevated protein dietary intake for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while on psychotropic medication


European Autism Congress

March 14-15, 2019 | Zagreb, Croatia

Lorry Chen

Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital,Canada

Scientific Tracks Abstracts: Autism Open Access

Abstract :

Weight gain, which is one of the harmful effects of psychotropic medication, is likely the best understood risk factor for obesity in both children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data obtained from clinical and nationally representative populations of children demonstrate that approximately 30%-60% of children with ASD are prescribed at least one psychotropic medication, and 10% are prescribed more than three medications at the same time. To date, no established treatments or preventative measures have been developed to combat psychotropic-induced weight gain (PIWG). Controlled energy intake combined with elevated protein intake (CEEP), may represent an effective and practical strategy for limiting weight gain. Potential beneficial outcomes associated with protein ingestion include: a) increased satiety-protein generally increases satiety to a greater extent than carbohydrate or fat and may facilitate a reduction in energy consumption; b) increased thermogenesis-higherprotein diets are associated with an increase in thermogenesis, which also influences satiety and increase energy expenditure; and c) maintenance or growth of fat-free mass (muscle) - in some individuals, a moderately higher protein diet may provide an increase effect on muscle protein synthesis, favoring the retention of lean muscle mass while improving metabolic profile. This proposed study’s primary objective was to evaluate the feasibility (study designs, methods, and processes) and acceptability (client/family satisfaction, perceived effectiveness) of a controlled energy diet with elevated protein intake to combat PIWG in children with ASD who are currently taking prescribed psychotropic medication.

Biography :

Lorry Chen has completed her Dietetic Education from Western University and has been in clinical practice for more than 25 years in a pediatric rehabilitation hospital serving children with disabilities. In addition to her clinical practice, her research interest includes exploring energy requirements, obesity and the evaluation of anthropometric parameters in children with disabilities. She has been a collaborator in several published research articles in peer reviewed journals about obesity in children with disabilities.

E-mail: [email protected]

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