Journal of Food Processing & Technology

Journal of Food Processing & Technology
Open Access

ISSN: 2157-7110

+441704335730

Carol Sze Ki LIN

Carol Sze Ki LIN

Carol Sze Ki LIN
Assistant Professor
City University of Hong Kong, China

Biography

Dr. Carol Lin is an Assistant Professor in the School of Energy and Environment at the City University of Hong Kong. She was a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Bioengineering Program in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the HKUST from January 2010 to June 2011. Prior to this, she was a postdoctoral researcher in the research group of Professor Wim Soetaert at the Centre of Expertise – Industrial Biotechnology and Biocatalysis (InBio.be) at the Ghent University in Belgium. She worked in a project titled ‘‘Optimalisation and scale up for succinate production using genetically modified Escherichia coli’. It was the last phase of a collaborative project titled the “Metabolic engineering and dynamic modelling of Escherichia coli for the production of chemicals from renewable resources” (MEMORE) project.
Carol graduated in Chemical Engineering from the University of Auckland, New Zealand with a 1st class honours degree. Her PhD was carried out within the Satake Centre for Grain Process Engineering (SCGPE) in the School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science at the University of Manchester, England. In collaboration with the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence at the University of York, her research focused on novel wheat-based biorefining strategies for the production of succinic acid.

Research Interest

The term food co-product encompasses raw, processed (mainly cooked), spoil and excess food materials that are disposed of before or during food preparation. In Hong Kong, the amount of food co-product discarded is significant, for example, the food co-product from households, restaurants and the food industry accounts for 40% of municipal solid wastes in Hong Kong. The social, economic and environmental impact of food co-product disposal is enormous. Therefore, there is an imminent need to reduce the quantity of food co-product disposal to landfills. At the same time, the development of effective food waste conversion process/technology aiming at waste processing at the source is desired.
Dr. Lin’s research targets the valorization of food co-products through conversion into commercially valuable products with current and/or future markets, such as the production of bio-degradable polymer and specialty chemicals.

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