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Review Articles In Animal Locomotion | Peer Reviewed Journals
Orthopedic & Muscular System: Current Research

Orthopedic & Muscular System: Current Research
Open Access

ISSN: 2161-0533

Review Articles In Animal Locomotion

The waves of muscular contraction which pass along the body of a swimming eel occur also in other fish. The waves vary greatly in speed of propagation, amplitude and frequency. The speed of propagation of the waves is too low to be controlled by the rate of conduction of a simple nervous impulse. 2. The movements executed by a localised area on the surface of the body are such that each. Animal locomotion, in ethology, is any of a variety of methods that animals use to move from one place to another.[1] Some modes of locomotion are (initially) self-propelled, e.g., running, swimming, jumping, flying, hopping, soaring and gliding. There are also many animal species that depend on their environment for transportation, a type of mobility called passive locomotion, e.g., sailing (some jellyfish), kiting (spiders), rolling (some beetles and spiders) or riding other animals (phoresis). Animals move for a variety of reasons, such as to find food, a mate, a suitable microhabitat, or to escape predators. For many animals, the ability to move is essential for survival and, as a result, natural selection has shaped the locomotion methods and mechanisms used by moving organisms. For example, migratory animals that travel vast distances (such as the Arctic tern) typically have a locomotion mechanism that costs very little energy per unit distance, whereas non-migratory animals that must frequently move quickly to escape predators are likely to have energetically costly, but very fast, locomotion.

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