Immunome Research

Immunome Research
Open Access

ISSN: 1745-7580

+32 28087017

Hung T Khong

Hung T Khong

Hung T Khong
Associate Professor, Division of Medical Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute
University of Utah, USA

Biography

Dr. Khong is an Associate Professor in the Division of Medical Oncology at the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) of the University of Utah, where he treats patients and conducts translational research in melanoma, breast cancer, cancer immunotherapy, and targeted therapy. Prior to joining HCI in December of 2011, he was an Associate Professor at the University of South Alabama Mitchell Cancer Institute where he took on various leadership roles including Head of Clinical Immunotherapeutics Research Laboratory and Interim-Chief of Medical Oncology Service, and Associate Director for Clinical Research Dr Khong received his B.A. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Four years later, he graduated from Temple University School of Medicine, followed by an internal medicine residency at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Next, Dr Khong received an appointment to the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, where he excelled as a clinical fellow in both the medical oncology branch and the surgical branch. Khong specializes in the treatment of melanoma and breast cancer. He has developed several innovative clinical trials for the neoadjuvant treatment of stages II and III breast cancer, first line therapy for metastatic breast cancer, and for advanced or metastatic melanoma.

Research Interest

Khong’s research and clinical interests include cancer immunotherapy and epigenetic modulation in the treatment of cancer. His research focuses on the following: Adoptive cellular therapy and cancer vaccines (manipulation of the immune system to treat cancer). Combining treatment methods such as chemo- or radiotherapy with immunotherapy (using the immune system to enhance the effects of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy). Chemotherapy with targeted therapy (drugs that intervene with specific molecules involved in tumor growth).

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