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Types and Causes of Forest Fire
Forest Research: Open Access

Forest Research: Open Access
Open Access

ISSN: 2168-9776

Perspective - (2022)Volume 11, Issue 3

Types and Causes of Forest Fire

 
*Correspondence: David Martin, Department of Planning and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia, Email:

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Description

A wildfire, also known as a forest fire, bushfire, wildland fire, or rural fire, is an uncontrolled fire that starts in combustible vegetation in rural or urban regions. In their natural form, several forest ecosystems rely on wildfire. A wildfire can be classified as a forest fire, brush fire, bushfire (in Australia), desert fire, grass fire, hill fire, peat fire, prairie fire, vegetation fire, or veld fire, depending on the type of vegetation present. Wildfires are distinct from managed burns, which are good uses of fire, albeit controlled burns can convert into wildfires [1]. Wildfires began shortly after the advent of terrestrial plants 419 million years ago during the Silurian period, according to fossil charcoal. The presence of wildfires throughout the history of terrestrial life leads to the conclusion that fire must have had significant evolutionary effects on the flora and fauna of most ecosystems. Fires thrive in the Earth's carbon-rich flora, seasonally dry temperatures, atmospheric oxygen, and ubiquitous lightning and volcanic ignitions. Wildfires are frequently classed based on factors such as the cause of ignition, physical qualities, the presence of flammable material, and the impact of weather on the fire. A variety of factors, including accessible fuels, physical environment, and weather, influence wildfire behaviour and severity. Severe wildfires are frequently preceded by climatic cycles that include rainy periods that develop substantial fuels, followed by drought and heat. Extreme weather brought on by climate change exacerbates these cycles [2].

Causes of forest fire

Forest fires are activated by both natural and man-made sources.

Natural causes: Many forest fires are started by natural causes such as lightning striking trees and setting them ablaze. Rain, on the other hand, extinguishes such fires without causing significant harm. The combination of high temperatures and little humidity creates ideal conditions for a fire to ignite [3].

Man-made causes: When a source of ignition, such as a bare flame, cigarette or bidi, electric spark, or any other source of ignition, comes into contact with flammable material, it generates fire. Graziers and gatherers of several forest products initiate small fires to attain good grazing grass as well as to facilitate assembly of minor forest produce such as flowers of Madhuca indica and leaves of Diospyros melanoxylon. We can inhibit human-caused fires through education and environmental modification. It will include engineering works, silvicultural activities, people participation, and enforcement and education. It is suggested that more prominence be given to people participation over Joint Forest Fire Management for fire prevention [4].

Types of forest fire

• Surface Fire

• Underground Fire

• Ground Fire

• Crown Fire

• Firestorms

Forest fires are usually only seen during certain times of the year. They usually begin during the dry season and can be avoided with proper care. Forest-fighting funding have been granted in previous Five-Year Plans. During the British time, summer fires were prevented by clearing forest trash all along the forest boundary [5]. "Forest Fire Line" was the name of the project. This line was employed to keep fire from spreading from one compartment to the next. The litter was collected and burned in a separate location. The fire will only expand if there is a constant supply of fuel (dry grass) along its route. The easiest strategy to control a forest fire is to keep it from spreading, which can be accomplished by constructing firebreaks in the form of shallow ditches in the forest.

Conclusion

Forest fires are usually only seen during certain times of the year. They usually begin during the dry season and can be avoided with proper care. Forest-fighting funding have been granted in previous Five-Year Plans. During the British time, summer fires were prevented by clearing forest trash all along the forest boundary. "Forest Fire Line" was the name of the project. This line was employed to keep fire from spreading from one compartment to the next. The litter was collected and burned in a separate location. The fire will only expand if there is a constant supply of fuel (dry grass) along its route. The easiest strategy to control a forest fire is to keep it from spreading, which can be accomplished by constructing firebreaks in the form of shallow ditches in the forest.

References

Author Info

 
1Department of Planning and Environmental Management, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
 

Citation: Martin D (2022) Types and causes of Forest Fire. J For Res. 11:318.

Received: 02-May-2022, Manuscript No. JFOR-22-17019; Editor assigned: 06-May-2022, Pre QC No. JFOR-22-17019 (PQ); Reviewed: 20-May-2022, QC No. JFOR-22-17019; Revised: 27-May-2022, Manuscript No. JFOR-22-17019 (R); Published: 03-Jun-2022 , DOI: 10.35248/2168-9776.22.11.318

Copyright: ©2022 Martin D. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.