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The Motor Functional Independence Measure Items and Targeted Minimal level Contributing to Improved Motor Functional Independence Measure Gain in Stroke Patients in the Recovery Rehabilitation Ward | Abstract
International Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

International Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Open Access

ISSN: 2329-9096

Abstract

The Motor Functional Independence Measure Items and Targeted Minimal level Contributing to Improved Motor Functional Independence Measure Gain in Stroke Patients in the Recovery Rehabilitation Ward

Takashi Kimura

Objective: To determine motor Functional Independence Measure items and Functional Independence Measure  levels that contribute to motor Functional Independence Measure gain after stroke.

Methods: This was a multicentre cross-sectional study including a total of 5,454 stroke patients who were registered in the Japan Rehabilitation Database. All participants were selected based on age, days from onset to admission, length of ward stay, and motor Functional Independence Measure items upon admission. Participants were divided into three subgroups based on the motor Functional Independence Measure items upon admission, and then further classified into non-improving and improving subgroups based on the mean of motor Functional Independence Measure gain. Multiple logistic regression and contribution analyses were used to analyse variables that contribute to the increase of motor Functional Independence Measure items. The Mann-Whitney U test and Chisquared test was used to analyse the Functional Independence Measure level of contribution items.

Results: Items that highly contributed to motor Functional Independence Measure increase were as follows: Stairs, Bathing, and Dressing (Lower Body), which are considered to require moderate assistance, and Bladder management and Toileting, which require supervision or set-up. The odds ratio value of Stairs was lower than that of other items even though its contribution score was the highest in groups 1 and 2.

Conclusion: Items related to gait, self-care, and sphincter control were identified, and each required modified dependence and supervision or set-up level at discharge.