Medical Safety & Global Health

Medical Safety & Global Health
Open Access

ISSN: 2574-0407

+32-466-901905

All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Abstract

Occupational Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids among Health Care Workers in Mizan Tepi University Teaching Hospital, Bench Maji Zone, South West Ethiopia

Tilahun Mekonnin, Adane Tsegaye, Abraham Berihun, Haimanot Kassachew and Addisalem Sileshi

Background: Occupational exposure to blood and body fluids refers to the exposure rate of Health care workers from patients’ blood and body fluids that will lead to infections which can be hazardous chronic communicable diseases like hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human Immuno deficiency virus.

Objective: To assess prevalence of occupational exposure to blood and body fluids among health care workers in Mizan Tepi University Teaching Hospital, Bench Maji Zone, South Region, South west Ethiopia, 2018.

Methods: Hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted with interview administered structured questionnaires. The census was done to include all 223 respondents. The result presented by tables, graphs and texts.

Result: The participant’s age groups ranged from 22-54 years. From 158 participants there were 87 (55%) males and71 (45%) females. Among the 158 participants majority of the participants 78 (49.5%) were nurses. The prevalence of occupational exposure among HCWs to patients’ blood and body fluids (BBFs) was 74%. The reported occupational exposure to patients’ BBFs during the last 1 year was 75 (64.1%), and 42 (35.9%) had an exposure to BBFs before one year. From 117 who were exposed to BBFs majority of the participants 34 (29.0%) were exposed while collecting a blood sample, followed by 31 (26.5%) while setting IV line, 29 (24.8%) while conducting delivery,18 (15.4%) during elective and emergency surgery and 5 (4.3%) during instrument processing. Anesthetists and Emergency surgeons were exposed to patients BBFs 100%, followed by 91.8% Midwifes.

Conclusion: The reported prevalence of occupational exposure to patients’ blood and body floods was high among health professionals in Mizan Tepi University Teaching Hospital. Anesthetics, Emergency surgeons and Midwifes were the highly exposed professionals to patients BBFs

Top