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A Comparison of High Intensity Interval Training with Circuit Training in a Short-Term Cardiac Rehabilitation Programme for Patients with Chronic Heart Failure | Abstract
International Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

International Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Open Access

ISSN: 2329-9096

Abstract

A Comparison of High Intensity Interval Training with Circuit Training in a Short-Term Cardiac Rehabilitation Programme for Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

Louisa Beale, Robert McIntosh, Prashanth Raju, Guy Lloyd and Gary Brickley

High intensity interval exercise may be a more effective training method than moderate intensity exercise more commonly applied in cardiac rehabilitation. This randomized controlled trial compared the effects of high intensity interval training with moderate intensity circuit training on exercise tolerance and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure. Twenty six patients with systolic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction 15-40%, New York Heart Association class II-III, age 62-87 years) were randomly assigned to circuit training (n=13) or high intensity interval training (n=13) during a 6 week cardiac rehabilitation programme. At baseline and on completion peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), oxygen consumption at ventilatory threshold (VT), ventilatory efficiency and disease specific quality of life were assessed. There was a significant increase in VO2peak after training in the circuit group only (0.97 ml.kg-1.min-1 P=0.021). Both groups showed significant improvements in VT (circuit 0.55 ml.kg-1.min-1 P=0.050; interval 1.70 ml.kg-1.min-1 P=0.006) and in quality of life (circuit-7 points P=0.017; interval-5 points P=0.050). There were no significant differences between the two training methods. High intensity interval exercise offers an alternative training mode for improving sub maximal exercise tolerance and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure. However, the improvements did not match those reported in studies using more frequent and longer duration training interventions.