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Can influenza viruses be inactivated by a "nose-mouth-nose" breathing technique? | Abstract
Immunological Disorders and Immunotherapy

Immunological Disorders and Immunotherapy
Open Access

ISSN: 2593-8509

+1-504-608-2390

Abstract

Can influenza viruses be inactivated by a "nose-mouth-nose" breathing technique?

Carlos Sánchez Fernández

Can influenza viruses be inactivated by a "nose-mouth-nose" breathing technique? 

Carlos Sánchez Fernández

University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain

 

 

Nasal airway obstruction is one of the first symptoms of viral infections (upper respiratory tract). In order to solve this problem, we use topical nasal decongestants, but the effectiveness and safety of nasal decongestants is limited. Aim: By means of using a breathing technique, we improve nasal obstruction, and so to avoid using nasal decongestants Method: The air we breathe out, contains about 100 times more carbon dioxide concentration, more water vapour and less oxygen. This is the hypothesis I adopted, according to which, the carbon dioxide concentration in the exhaled air could act as a vasoconstrictor of nasal mucosa and inactivate the flu viruses. On the other hand, nose breathing helps us to use our own nitric oxide generated in sinuses. The physiology of the autonomic nervous system, help us to understand the decongestant effect of this breathing technique. Technique: A/ Put your hand in a vertical position, as shown in the image. B/ Place the palm of your hand below the chin, in contact. This serves to create a cavity between the hand and the nostrils. C/ Flex the fingers of your hand and touch the tip of your nose. D/ With the other hand, raising the elbow 90 degrees, grabs the fingers of the other hand to close them. Once we have created the mask, we inhale the air exhaled by mouth. Results: We have observed that 10 patients that did use this breathing technique correctly, they did not develop symptoms of flu viruses, over the years. They did not come to my office because of symptoms of a cold, solving themselves by means of using this respiratory technique. Someone of them, were not vaccinated against the flu. Of course, I recommend to my patients be vaccinated against flu, but I also recommend to them, to practice this technique by 60 seconds, each time they sneeze. Conclusions: This is a safe, efficient and effective technique to reduce the use of nasal vasoconstrictors, in nasal obstruction by a cold and it could inactivate viruses flu. 

 

Published Date: 2020-10-23;

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