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A Randomized Controlled Trial Assessing Whether Listening to Music at Time of Embryo Transfer Effects Anxiety Levels | Abstract
Gynecology & Obstetrics

Gynecology & Obstetrics
Open Access

ISSN: 2161-0932

Abstract

A Randomized Controlled Trial Assessing Whether Listening to Music at Time of Embryo Transfer Effects Anxiety Levels

Stocker LJ, Hardingham KL and Cheong YC

Background: Fertility treatment may have a negative emotional impact on women. Lower levels of anxiety have been associated with improved treatment success but there is no standardised method for addressing these needs. Music is a safe and beneficial non-pharmacological intervention in a number of medical fields. It may alter subjective and objective psychological anxiety as well as physiological functioning. However, little data exists surrounding the therapeutic use of music in fertility treatment but it may attenuate anxiety.

Methods: An assessor-blinded parallel case control study in an IVF center, England UK. 42 women undergoing assisted reproductive treatment were recruited between February and December 2013. Women were randomised by random envelopes containing equal sized 'music' (listened to self-selected music during embryo transfer) or 'control' (no music) groups. Participants completed the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory prior to, and immediately following a post-treatment observation period. Primary outcome was change in anxiety level.

Results: 32 of 42 women (76.2%) were less anxious following treatment (mean change in anxiety score 6.9 95%CI 4.2-9.6, P<0.01) without difference between the study group (7.1 95% CI 3.5-10.7) (P=0.46) and controls (6.7 95%CI 2.3-11.1). Clinical pregnancy rates (55.0%) did not differ between music and control groups (P=0.95).

Conclusions: Listening to self-selected music 15 minutes before and after embryo transfer does not significantly impact on anxiety levels of women undergoing assisted conception treatment nor clinical pregnancy rates. Music therapy has not been shown to reduce anxiety at time of ET and the effects of interventions such as hypnosis, acupuncture, aromatherapy and other forms of relaxation therapy remain to be explored.

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