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Diet and Subclinical Inflammation amongst Ellisras Young Adults Aged 18 to 30 Years: Ellisras Longitudinal Study | Abstract
Cardiovascular Pharmacology: Open Access

Cardiovascular Pharmacology: Open Access
Open Access

ISSN: 2329-6607

Abstract

Diet and Subclinical Inflammation amongst Ellisras Young Adults Aged 18 to 30 Years: Ellisras Longitudinal Study

Tshephang M.J. Mashiane, Kotsedi D. Monyeki, Mbelege R. Nkwana, Solomon S.R. Choma, Andre P Kengne

Subclinical inflammation is triggered by consumption of high dietary fat intake that increases cholesterol levels, blocks and disrupts the regulation of blood flow in the vessels resulting in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) [1]. A gain in body weight or obesity is linked with subclinical inflammation, which develops progressively as the body mass index (BMI) and abdominal fatincreases [1]. Subclinical inflammation is diagnosed by elevations of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) [3]. Overweight and obesity are associated with increased levels of CRP [2]. This is due to individuals consuming high amounts of sugar, total fat, saturated fatty acids and cholesterol and low consumption of fruits and vegetables, fish, poultry and dietary fibre [4]. There are few studies that have been done on the effects of diet on inflammatory markers such as CRP among young adults. Thus, inflammatory markers such as CRP may be important early predictors of adult chronic disease risk [5]. Preliminary results from the Ellisras cohort study showed a significant association between dietary intake and BMI [6]. However, the relationship between diet and subclinical inflammation among rural young South African adults was not investigated. Accordingly, the present study aims to investigate the relationship between diet and subclinical inflammation among young adults aged 18 to 30 years from the rural Ellisras setting in South Africa.

Published Date: 2021-09-13;

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